r/technology Dec 01 '22

Majority of US Defense Contractors Not Meeting Basic Cybersecurity Requirements Security

https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/us-defense-contractors/
1.6k Upvotes

112 comments sorted by

133

u/ActualAccount009 Dec 01 '22

So they’re hiring? 👀

46

u/shiftypugs Dec 01 '22

Yes every major one i can think of has 100s of openings across the US.

27

u/Thisoneismyfavourite Dec 01 '22 edited Dec 02 '22

I was looking at Raytheon jobs this morning and it seemed like half the listenings were in IT.

31

u/thecakeisalie1013 Dec 01 '22

I left as did my manager and almost everyone on my engineering team. I think at some point Raytheon kinda stopped caring bc they can’t afford to compete with other companies. One engineer got a raise by getting another offer, so another tried but they said they couldn’t afford it. I heard if an IT member threatened to leave they would immediately get a raise. IT and cybersecurity are holding up projects for months bc they have insane turnover rates.

5

u/EnsignElessar Dec 01 '22

Whats work life balance like? Can you choose which projects you work on?

10

u/thecakeisalie1013 Dec 01 '22

Work life balance was pretty good. Every other Friday off and I knew some people that switched to every Friday off and 10 hour days. Tho there was usually a reason like grad school.

When I joined you got put on whatever program they needed you on. If you know the right people you can move around, but unlike other departments engineering can put their foot down and say you’re too valuable on a current team to move somewhere else.

Overall I left because I learned next to nothing software wise. I was supposedly on a bad program and there was a lot of bad leadership. My team lead was great and super smart but it wasn’t enough to make up for all the other problems.

3

u/SFXBTPD Dec 01 '22 edited Dec 01 '22

Their profit per employee (i.e. operating margin * revenue per employee) is only $37000. So giving software guys 10% raises could seriously reduce their profit.

Not saying right or wrong, but on the scale of companies saying they cant afford raises they arent aggregious offendors.

5

u/thecakeisalie1013 Dec 01 '22

I think the 20% attrition rate in engineering has to be hurting their margin pretty bad. Hiring new people isn’t cheap. In the case of the guy they wouldn’t give a raise, his replacement would need to get paid significantly more since he was way under market value. It’ll take the new guy at least 6 months to ramp up too, maybe more since they lost the entire team.

2

u/SFXBTPD Dec 01 '22

Im going to try to work out rough math.

Everyone getting a 10% raise will increase salary expenses by 10%. Atleast that case was easy.

20% new guys getting 25% more pay cost 5% more salaray. Lets say the start up period is 6 months. Lets average that cost out over 3 years. So you are losing 1/6 of their productivity. That makes them another 20% more expensive. Even then that increases the cost to 6% more salary expense.

Its annoying as shit to have to displace yourself and/or the family to find a new areojob to get a raise (unless you are in Huntsville i guess). But there is a business case for roleplaying as mr burns if you assume that the current market conditions will not persist long term.

3

u/thecakeisalie1013 Dec 02 '22

Alright, now factor in the 10k-50k sign on bonus plus relocation they have to offer to get anyone to consider moving to their terrible location.

Oh, and 6 months only works with a well functioning team. Not when then whole team leaves. Even then someone with 6 months on the team isn’t getting nearly as much done as someone that’s been on the team for 5 years. Plus, we took 6 months to hire someone and they took 6 months to ramp up, so we’re now a year behind on all that work.

It’s this short term thinking that destroys companies. Raytheon doesn’t care about their employees, and their employees don’t care about them. That’s why they have a ton of entry level employees with no experience, a lot of senior employees that go there to retire, and absolutely no one in the middle. Anyone with a brain leaves once they have experience.

1

u/phdoofus Dec 02 '22

Maybe the CEO should come out and say that the employees need to come out and show 'grit' and work 'insane hours'? That'll motivate 'em!

0

u/GameFreak4321 Dec 01 '22

They couldn't afford it because all the raise money went to the previous guy. /s

4

u/bch77777 Dec 02 '22 edited Dec 02 '22

Raytheon as an employer has been going downhill for years where me and at least 25 of my colleagues have resigned in the past three year. All of us were IP generating machines for the org. 100s of patents from us every year. Icing on the cake was when UTC (Greg Hayes) merged and took bonuses away from the bottom 5 layers of engineers and removed salary profiles/ranges from all but manager views. They continue to cut benefits. UTC engineers left one after another too. Top engineering talent is gone and will never return. Total bullshit article though. CMMC is a newer standard rolled out with to enhance a rigorous NIST 800-171 that all is the primes comply with. Yes, if we look at every Mom and Pop shop who sells two fasteners a year to the DoD, they vastly out number the number of primes so the article intentionally omits that data and misleads the reader.

3

u/alexp8771 Dec 01 '22

Because they are fucking dog shit jobs. I would rather be homeless than work for them again.

14

u/Kill3rT0fu Dec 01 '22

Got a security clearance? They're always hiring if you have one.

46

u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

we’ll pay you half of what you can get at google also you can’t smoke weed

7

u/enjoytheshow Dec 01 '22

Yeah but a ton of the engineers that the DoD is hiring aren’t gonna get hired by Google…. They have a small percentage of them that are and those guys are getting good money.

8

u/lordderplythethird Dec 01 '22

An untrained monkey could use ACAS or SCAP, and a defense contractor will pay you $150K a year to just use them for you... Google isn't going to pay that, hell Google isn't going to hire anyone because they're cutting over 10,000 people right now

2

u/distractedneighbor Dec 02 '22

How do I get this job?…

am indeed untrained monke.

9

u/User9705 Dec 01 '22

Yup I’m such a role. Maintaining it has been awesome after retiring from mil. I see public jobs being cut and no issues with govt.

5

u/EnsignElessar Dec 01 '22

You get lower salary, access to a better 401k and its a good place to weather a recession.

1

u/User9705 Dec 01 '22

Ha, depends on the job. But I just can just life has been grand since retiring from the mil, VA and etc.

2

u/EnsignElessar Dec 01 '22

Yes but how do I get clearance without a clearance job?

10

u/scoutsaint Dec 01 '22

C#/Java/Software Engineering skills particularly in IGA/IDAM, PAM or Cloud infrastructure systems. If you have these skills PM me. We will float you for 6 months till you get your interim secret security clearance.

5

u/Neverending_Rain Dec 01 '22

Most defense contractors will hire people without a clearance. Getting an interim clearance is pretty easy so long as there are no glaring issues. Having an active clearance isn't much more than a small bonus for most openings.

3

u/Adbam Dec 01 '22

I believe you have to speak with Clarence.

2

u/Kill3rT0fu Dec 01 '22

Military. Or Some employers will get you a clearance if you're an intern and you want to get hired on. I've even recently worked with someone who was neither former military or an intern and they were out in for a clearance. It's rare but it happens. Just depends on the role and scarcity of finding people with that experience

6

u/EnsignElessar Dec 01 '22

They need a better system if they want interested people to join... yeesh

11

u/Kill3rT0fu Dec 01 '22

They 100% do. Unfortunately it costs money for the investigations and to put someone in for a clearance and companies don't want to front those costs. It'll hurt them in the long run and they're seeing the effects now. Old timers are retiring, new kids are going to work for spaceX and other tech companies. Why work for Boeing or Northrop making half pay ? Clearance jobs do offer job security though. While everyone else is getting laid off, these jobs need to stay occupied.

1

u/scoutsaint Dec 01 '22 edited Dec 01 '22

A lot of people think this is the case. Sure for a document handler job in DC its easy but If you want a good salary and work from home you'd have to have skills also. One of my jobs is a technical screener for a SBEA company and the entitlement I encounter with recent veterans is disgusting.

1

u/ActualAccount009 Dec 07 '22

I do have a secret clearance but no experience…… yet

2

u/blofly Dec 01 '22

Yes, and also not paying the premium for good personnel.

1

u/tiggereth Dec 02 '22

Lol, the company I work for opened up a building in Austin because we can't get talent here. We have so much work that we're turning away opportunities.

42

u/goldfaux Dec 01 '22

Government software is old and requires out of support software to run it. Lots of security holes. Can confirm, i used to be a government contractor. On a side note, keeping up with security is very expensive, and even large corporations can spend 100 million per year just keeping everything up to date.

7

u/EnsignElessar Dec 01 '22

This is true but in general contractors are a great target. You can hit multiple targets at once, they generally have lax security and are quite small so hitting around the holidays is a great option.

51

u/hamiltonisoverrat3d Dec 01 '22

A shocking 87% of contractors have a sub-70 Supplier Performance Risk System (SPRS) score, the metric that shows how well a contractor meets Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) requirements.

DFARS, which has been law since 2017, requires a score of 110 for full compliance. Critics of the system have anecdotally deemed 70 to be “good enough,” but the overwhelming majority of contractors still come up short.

Roughly 80% of the DIB doesn’t monitor its systems 24/7/365 and doesn’t use U.S.-based security monitoring services. Other deficiencies were evident in the following categories that are currently required by law and will be required in the future to achieve CMMC compliance:

80% lack a vulnerability management solution 79% lack a comprehensive multi-factor authentication (MFA) system 73% lack an endpoint detection and response (EDR) solution 70% have not deployed security information and event management (SIEM)

3

u/GoldWallpaper Dec 01 '22

The majority of contractors have no competition for the contracts they receive, and any given department's (or sub-department's) money has to be spent or the department risks losing funding the following year(s). So there's really no impetus for anyone to improve their scores here.

All government departments, including Defense and NASA, are jobs programs first and foremost. People love to ask, "Why are we constantly raising our defense spending when it's already so high?" The answer is that every person in Congress is desperate for a piece of the pie, and the spending is structured specifically to give everyone a piece.

People in Congress will say, "We can't cut defense spending because a strong defense is vital to national security!!!" But our defense would be just as strong if we cut defense spending by 30% or more. What they actually mean is, "We can't shut off the firehose of cash being directed to my state!!"

If you find a government department that actually gets cut any given year, you know immediately that its budget wasn't spread-out enough to appease enough of Congress to keep or raise it.

15

u/macemillion Dec 01 '22

Yeah but how many of these contractors do stuff like sell the government toilet paper? If they’re not accessing/storing/sharing sensitive data it shouldn’t matter much, right?

35

u/tophermeyer Dec 01 '22

From an experience on government service contracts (not defense), I've been surprised how how broad the government's definitions of sensitive data is. Any data a federal contractor holds about the government is supposed to be restricted beyond what most private sector companies would do for themselves.

The philosophy being that poorly secured data can be used to exploit people and systems for other data, or aggregated to tell bigger stories. Like for example, if someone hacked seemingly benign data about toilet paper orders and saw a sharp increase at some foreign base. Toilet paper isn't classified. But data about how much the government is using is.

10

u/tempest_87 Dec 01 '22

That is called "classification by compilation". The combining of non-classified data that leads to classified data/information.

Your use of the toilet paper example is perfect.

0

u/alexp8771 Dec 01 '22

And that is why the government pays 10x for everything. They impose ridiculous unnecessary requirements for every little thing and the people that impose the requirements are not the same people who approve budgets so everything balloons out of control.

11

u/joelshep Dec 01 '22

A military lives and dies by its supply chain. If non-technology companies that produce food and supplies (clothing, shelter, personal gear, tools, sanitary supplies like soap and toilet paper, basic medical supplies, etc.) are disrupted by attacks on the technology they use to operate, it could severely impact the effectiveness of the forces depending on those supplies.

9

u/lucun Dec 01 '22

The amount of toilet paper they sell, what time they ship, and where they ship to can be used to extrapolate a location's headcount, how many days of supplies they might have, etc. Even advertisement companies can extrapolate a lot about you from seemingly unimportant information.

1

u/alexp8771 Dec 01 '22

Yes, but when you pay $20 per roll there is less money for actual soldiers and weapons.

1

u/AhoyPalloi Dec 01 '22

Watch how fast we surrender to our enemies when the pentagon goes a week without toilet paper.

1

u/NewDad907 Dec 02 '22

Right? SAP and ECI stuff is on air gapped, non-networked computers and hard copy paper.

3

u/_spicy_ Dec 01 '22

Writing out the initialisms is really helpful (thanks!), but you didn’t write out DIB. I have no idea what that means.

3

u/dravik Dec 01 '22

Defense Industrial Base

1

u/E_Snap Dec 01 '22

Lol, so we had to sit through the same e-conference/training week this summer, I see

7

u/NeuralNexus Dec 01 '22

They make the compliance process very difficult. So much bureaucracy about checking forms you filled vs what you actually have in place.

Also, defense contractors just do not pay competitive $ vs software companies and so they do not necessarily get that much traction on job offers.

6

u/dishwashersafe Dec 01 '22 edited Dec 01 '22

As an ex-defense contractor that had to deal with this when it was being implemented... thank god I don't work for the DoD anymore. The requirements are a nightmare. We were a small company and had to hire a full time security person and a full time IT person just to attempt to comply which put us at a big disadvantage compared to other small companies that weren't complying without consequence.

Quality of life and productivity in the office just kept getting worse and worse as we "improved security"... and it's not like we were dealing with any sensitive information or threats that justified that level of security.

I'm never touching another DoD job with a 10 ft pole. It drove a lot of good engineers away.

4

u/Katofdoom Dec 01 '22

Currently a DoD Engineering Tech contractor and I’m itching to get out. Can’t find anyone who pays a degree-less 20 something y/o with just military experience as well as the DoD does though. I’m currently in school for civil engineering so I can achieve my goal of having a stable job without relying on my security clearance.

2

u/dishwashersafe Dec 01 '22

Good luck! You should have no problem finding a good paying job with a civil degree. I get my paycheck from DoE now and it's such a friendlier, more collaborative, and more casual environment.

5

u/BF1shY Dec 01 '22

Cybersecurity is non-existent in the US. There is a metric (or imperial) fuckton of security theater though.

Every company I've ever worked in keeps all their usernames and passwords in a giant excel/google sheet.

Those that have used password managers, often keep the same passwords forever, or email out/share passwords regularly.

I've never seen a new piece of software get penetration testing or even hesitation if it's safe.

-1

u/PatriotsAndTyrants Dec 01 '22

LastPass just got hacked... There is no safety

11

u/Minkster404 Dec 01 '22

Wasn’t this the reason for the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification?

13

u/shiftypugs Dec 01 '22

It was but existing contracts got no new money to staff and buy equipment and tools to meet the requirements.

1

u/NeuralNexus Dec 03 '22

CMMC requirements were ridiculous. Unrealistic deadline. No additional funding. A sea of acronyms and meetings without meaning.

3

u/Blue10022 Dec 01 '22

CMMC has been neutered multiple times because the contracts that required it wanted more and weren’t paying for it. When the big businesses push back it forces them to review their standing on things. Current CMMC requirements are pitiful compared to the initial requirements.

2

u/dravik Dec 01 '22

The contractors aren't wrong on that one. If you want your contractor to do more, you have to pay more. Security requirements can get expensive pretty quickly.

2

u/beerandbikenerd Dec 01 '22

Absolutely, the tech mentioned in the article comes with a significant cost for any business (SIEM & EDR).

12

u/Bob_Sconce Dec 01 '22

A "Majority of US Defense Contractors" does not mean "people doing a majority of the defense work." There are a LOT of tiny defense contractors. The companies in that majority aren't BAH, Raytheon and Lockheed. It's companies like Fred and Dave's Custom Drone Accessories, Inc., a 3-person company. For a lot of them, not meeting the requirements isn't a major security risk since they're not dealing in any sort of classified information. [Not like they're leaving classified documents in desk drawers at Florida country clubs.]

19

u/burny97236 Dec 01 '22

So they can get more tax payer money to correct it and still not get it right

11

u/The-Sturmtiger-Boi Dec 01 '22

At least it isn’t open comms radios and aircraft navigation using your phone

3

u/PatriotsAndTyrants Dec 01 '22

The most likely scenario that is causing the under-performance is the "lowest bidder wins" plan the DoD operates by.

Big contract bids $***** amount of money because they've been doing this type of job for 15 years and know how much it's going to cost (salaries, modern equipment, miscelanious, etc).

Smaller company trying to become a "big boy" bids 20% less than BIG company. Smaller company is probably using estimates from the private sector. Private sector has reduced costs due to; automation, no security clearances, other things I can't come up with....

Smaller company wins bid (because DoD doesn't ask questions). Smaller company starts to fail metrics, continues to fail metrics, people flee sinking ship. Smaller company loses contract during option year 2 or 3, never learns lesson, cycle repeats.

1

u/GoldWallpaper Dec 01 '22

Hey, it works for ISPs!

Take government funds to build networks that don't exclude anyone from broadband, don't build the networks, and then ask for more money because people are being excluded from broadband. Rinse and repeat.

It's worked for ISPs since the Clinton administration. There's no reason the change things up now!

3

u/johnny_memetic Dec 01 '22

They're still using unlicensed mIRC, ffs.

3

u/W1ULH Dec 01 '22

and here my company is meticulously scrambling too up our rating...

3

u/No-Satisfaction3455 Dec 01 '22

yeah, the military after being in is a joke and only like 5% of that machine is efficient enough to cover the slack of the rest.

3

u/slow_connection Dec 02 '22

This is honestly shocking as it implies some defense contractors are actually meeting basic cyber security requirements

3

u/billnmorty Dec 02 '22

Working for a cyber security firm that specializes in CMMC , we meet with a new company every week and every week we hear the same nonsense from 3/4 - “it’s complicated” - “it’s expensive” - “we don’t have the expertise”

Guess what an MSSP with this specialization can do for you ?

10

u/SkyIsNotGreen Dec 01 '22

That's unsurprising, most people don't understand how the internet works, huge portions of it run on vastly outdated tech, most of it is defenceless, places that aren't defenceless almost certainly have entry points, and places that have neither probably publish the data needed for a breach on some form of social media

5

u/deadsoulinside Dec 01 '22

That's unsurprising, most people don't understand how the internet works, huge portions of it run on vastly outdated tech, most of it is defenceless, places that aren't defenceless almost certainly have entry points, and places that have neither probably publish the data needed for a breach on some form of social media

But that's more expected for your average Small-Mid business, versus a company that has a contract with the government.

Most of the small-mid businesses can't possibly think of why a bad actor would want to hack their company, so blow off any realization they could be compromised pretty badly. Only until something like ransomware or more common, a controllers account being compromised and their email address being used to request payee's to send the funds to a "New account" and sometimes not even then does that stop a few from sending the funds elsewhere.

Whereas with being a government contractor, you should be always vigil and aware that a person with malicious intent will always look for the weaker chains, like contractors to attempt to gain access to any and all systems. But from reading the article, it does appear that many don't have the proper resources in place, but from working in IT many years, all the CEO's see is cost savings by not spending an additional 100k+ a year on site-wide security for their systems. Not to mention additional costs for extra staffing just for this purpose of incident response.

Even small-mid businesses have responded "Why should we change anything? we have not had an incident in 20+ years" to only have their foot in their mouth the following week when Barb from accounting called the "Your IP address has been reported for XX reason" number on her screen. Then allowed a 3rd party remote viewing software to be installed on her system, because the CEO advised the IT department years before to make Barb a local admin on her machine.

Even a site hit 2x with ransomware still not seeing it as bad, because each time they just have IT fix the infected computer, restore shared files from the most recent backup, regardless if this means employees working hard to update their data for the last 24-48 hours since the last backup.

Why spend anymore on even a product like SentinelOne that could mitigate and attempt to recover the data ASAP, versus having servers offline for days while everything is being worked on on site to recover and restore services? They will still see their 3rd party IT bill of 10k or whatever being a win versus 25k+ a year in a complete endpoint solution being deployed across all computers and servers.

The biggest issue with both sides (CEO's and Internal IT or MSP's they may contract with for products and services) is most don't work nearly as hard as they should to be proactive with their security, only reactive responses once someone messes up.

3

u/Tbone_Trapezius Dec 01 '22

Compliance isn’t cheap, yo.

14

u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

Its cheaper than a breach, and if youre an big business you can most certainly afford it, its all about convincing the greedy CEO's to bother investing into it, its why breaches and malware is at an all time high, because businesses are not covering all attack vectors for some reason.

6

u/Wwwweb Dec 01 '22

Cheaper to whom? In a lot of cases an executive is probably better off rolling the dice on a breach and getting an insane bonus. Bad behavior is incentived this way.

5

u/Cybtroll Dec 01 '22

Not for "some reasons". For a quick buck in this year results.

2

u/Ok_Skill_1195 Dec 01 '22

A for-profit contractor behaving exactly like we should expect them to?? Say it isn't so!

2

u/deadsoulinside Dec 01 '22

Breaches are a PITA to deal with if your are a government contractor. Requires all sorts of paperwork to be filled out and details, etc.

1

u/AbidanYre Dec 01 '22

The team that fills out paperwork is probably cheaper than the team that plugs security holes.

2

u/dishwashersafe Dec 01 '22 edited Dec 01 '22

But if you're a small business, you can't afford it. Excluding small businesses (that are often cheaper and more innovative) from defense contracts just isn't good business.

2

u/Own_Arm1104 Dec 01 '22

For being a capitalist society we are really not good at capital

2

u/Inconceivable-2020 Dec 01 '22

It would probably interfere with their rampant misplacing of funds.

2

u/WillBottomForBanana Dec 01 '22

This is my surprised face.

2

u/ThisWhiteVoid Dec 02 '22

I’ve been working on bootstrapping security improvements, effectively identifying actionable prerequisites to get some momentum going. This resulted in me discovering four “meta-prerequisites” for almost any IT security improvement to be successfully implemented; a computer literate CIO, adequate staffing levels, a functioning training framework, and process-driven management.

Working out what proportion of businesses out there have all four is left as an exercise for the reader.

2

u/N3UROTOXINsRevenge Dec 01 '22

Uhhh duh? Like most companies.

2

u/TXWayne Dec 01 '22

How about that GAO report on how well the DoD is doing the same?

-1

u/lordderplythethird Dec 01 '22

GAO will interview 2 people, take it as holy gospel, write a report based off what those people said and what GAO just assumes, and present it as the absolute truth.

Source - worked with GAO before. Absolutely fucking worthless waste of money.

1

u/Lick-a-Leper Dec 01 '22

Plausible denial. If the security is flawed then it looks less suspicious when they they sell the tech in secret. They can claim it was stolen and then ask the Government for money to help fix the 'weak ' security.

6

u/fuzzywolf23 Dec 01 '22

Never attribute to malice what can be explained by incompetence

2

u/xlamplighter Dec 02 '22

Or profit motive

0

u/Lahm0123 Dec 01 '22

Cybersecurity is not basic or easy.

2

u/Philip_of_mastadon Dec 01 '22

A lot of it is

-1

u/YouandWhoseArmy Dec 01 '22

Can we start calling them war contractors?

The USA hasn’t had a credible threat to defend itself from in decades.

2

u/fuzzywolf23 Dec 01 '22

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwasong-17

Just because we're not currently in a shooting war with a peer adversary doesn't mean there aren't credible threats that need defending.

The Hwasong-17 may contain three or four warheads, or potentially a mix of decoys and real warheads, so the launch of just a few missiles would be enough to overwhelm U.S. defenses

-2

u/YouandWhoseArmy Dec 01 '22

If you think North Korea is a threat to the United States you’re a fool.

1

u/fuzzywolf23 Dec 01 '22

I'm sure the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace would love to hear your unique and brilliant analysis on the subject

https://www.dw.com/en/what-do-we-know-about-north-koreas-monster-missile/a-61259183

-3

u/YouandWhoseArmy Dec 01 '22

I’m sure nothing in that refutes anything I’ve said.

NK has nukes as a defense from the United States. It’s the only thing we respect. It’s why regimes keep seeking them out, because otherwise they have no chance.

Libya gave up the nukes. How’s that working for them.

You’re too stupid to understand action, reaction and who hold the power to act in the world. It’s not Libya or North Korea. Idiot.

0

u/p4r14h Dec 02 '22

Mommy’s going to order the VR headset, don’t worry

1

u/AbidanYre Dec 01 '22

Nice try dude, I saw the Red Dawn remake.

1

u/PatriotsAndTyrants Dec 01 '22

I think the problem is hard to decipher.

It's in the military industrial complex's best interest to keep sounding the alarm; "threats are everywhere! America MUST be a military super power to remain safe!!!"

So how can you believe anyone that is a part of that community to be objective. Hey private intel analyst corporation/think tank, do you really see threats over there, there, and there? Or are just telling us there is a threat so your buddy will continue to get multi-billion dollar weapons contracts?

However, just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they are not out to get you. Doesn't matter that the U.S foreign policy is the reason why so much of the world hates the U.S.

My vote, slash the DoD budget by 70% and see what happens. As long as we don't try to invade Mexico or Canada, we will probably by fine.

-2

u/geosaus Dec 01 '22

Fuq da ai coming straight from the underground

-2

u/marc_5813 Dec 01 '22

Some of the software I worked on at a previous contractor was written with C++98 and Fortran. If the government cared at all about wasted taxpayer dollars the first thing they’d do is stop awarding contracts to contractors that work on half-baked, lazy projects.

1

u/dishwashersafe Dec 01 '22

Some of the software I worked on at a previous job was in Fortran and it was still the best language for the job.

0

u/DanteJazz Dec 01 '22

Haven't they watched Galatica?

0

u/monchota Dec 01 '22

Then they need to lose thier contracts, no exceptions.

0

u/Dundundunimyourbun Dec 01 '22

I feel like this is the info-release equivalent of yelling “RELOADING!!!” like the characters in COD.

0

u/firedrakes Dec 01 '22

Could have told you that already

0

u/phdoofus Dec 02 '22

Somehow this is the government's fault. /s